Tag Archives: vintage

We Got Keys!

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The house is officially ours! We sold our last home in 2006 so we feel like brand new home owners. We went into the house for the first time on our own to really evaluate what needed to be done. We already had a plan on what we wanted to do, but it’s hard to really know the scope of work without punching a few holes in the wall. We had a small toolbox there, but none of the stuff we will really needed for the job. All of us took a turn punching holes in a wall, which by the way, is a fantastic feeling. We pulled up carpet and pulled up a bit of the kitchen linoleum. Here is where we stand.

The walls were built with a plaster board. At first I was confused, because it was covered in paper like drywall, and was in sheets like drywall, but was clearly not gypsum. I did some research and found that in the 60’s they came out with a product that would allow people to plaster their walls in sheets. Drywall had become more popular during WWII, but plaster was still considered primo. These sheets were like drywall, but filled with plaster. So today it feels more like concrete than drywall, but you can still easily punch a hole through the wall and tear it off. Conclusion: no problem to demo, but may take a little more time than standard gypsum board.

The carpet in the extra room, which I will call the suite from now on, came off pretty easily. Boy was it dirty under the pad. Years of dust sifting down through the carpet and pad. Underneath is a fantastic pine plank floor. There is some glue residue from the carpet, but no big deal. The majority of this wood will be lifted out for use on other projects. We will then tile the bathroom portion. Conclusion: as expected.

The carpet in the master bedroom was a different story. Under the current carpet we found the original carpet. It was worn threadbare, but still sticking hard to the pine floors. It was glued down and has a rubber like backing which does not want to come up. We researched and found a product called Sentinel 747 that we are going to try. Conclusion: this is going to take a long time and will be hard labor.

The linoleum in the kitchen is not glued down as thoroughly as it could be, which is good, but it is still a pain like any linoleum. Underneath is a 3/8″ plywood sub floor. Under that is the pine floor we are reaching for. We don’t know yet if they just screwed the plywood down or also glued it. We bought a heat gun to help soften the linoleum as we take it off. Hopefully the plywood isn’t glued. I would love to be able to lift the pieces whole so I can use them to patch the chicken coop and dog house. The condition of the pine remains to be seen. Conclusion: As expected, labor intensive work. Still some unknowns.

The chimney stack rises through what will become the washroom. It is currently covered in plaster and we want to expose the brick. Whoever plastered it did it right, steel mesh and all. Break out the pneumatic chisel. Conclusion: with the right tools, it shouldn’t be too bad. Hopefully the brick is in good shape.

After completing the evaluation, we took the next day to plan and make a list of things we needed. So last night was a Home Depot night instead of a work night. But tonight starts the real demolition. May our hammers swing freely! #DemoDay

The Good Old-Fashioned Barn Razing

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I have mentioned in previous posts the use of barn wood from my grandpa's barn. There is some extra meaning in all of those projects because everytime I look at the finished product I remember days spent playing in the hay loft, mucking stalls, feeding the cows, stepping in manure, and playing in the corral. Unfortunately, I am out of that wood, but I still have lots of projects I want to complete using barn wood. How could I find more? The price of barn wood is super high when you try to buy it from reclaimed materials stores. Once in a blue moon something may pop up on Craigslist, but is gone almost immediately. Without knowing the land owner, it's almost impossible to get to a barn in time to harvest the wood before the whole thing is gone.

But recently my luck changed. A friend mentioned to my wife some small projects he built out of wood from an old barn on the property where he works that the owners are planning to tear down. It is no longer needed as a barn and the land is more valuable than the building. She immediately became interested, knowing I am always on the lookout. The discussion involved getting me to help build a stable for the church Christmas party live nativity, and know she knew they had a hook to get me to say yes.

And of course she was absolutely right. The time it will take to build a simple outline of a stable is well worth all of the free wood I can harvest! The company has already contracted someone to tear town the barn, so it was only a matter of weeks until my chance was gone. The contractor just had one other job to finish first. We set up a time with my friend and we met him at the barn to take a look. It was fantastic! There is wood of different dimensions, doors, and windows. So with a hammer and crowbar we set out to work. I took out a window that is still mostly intact and started in on some wall boards and doors. The giving was slow and the sun went down before we could really get all we wanted.

Every day was one day closer to the bulldozer, so I had to hurry back before it was too late. I decided the job needed to go faster, so I got a reciprocal saw for the return trip. Man, did that make a difference! Instead of trying to pull out multiple nails on multiple studs for each board, I ripped down one side inside the stud and then could just pry the board off the wall. I took down an entire wall, and then the walls of two pens. With another van load cut down, my garage now has a huge stack of barn wood ready to go.

I would talk about my plans for the wood, but that would ruin Christmas now wouldn't it? You will just have to wait and see with everyone else!

 

The Magic Floating Book Shelf

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I love books. I love reading. I love bookstores and libraries and covet homes with big floor to ceiling book shelves with a rolling ladder. One of the first things I do when I move to a new place is to sign up for a library card. I especially love old books. I love the smell of books and the feel of books. But books are heavy and books take up a lot of space. Books are hard to move around from place to place, especially if they are not being read regularly.

Then came e-readers. E-readers like the Kindle and Nook are awesome. You can fit thousands of books on a single device and the battery lasts forever. You can use a tablet, but the e-ink on an e-reader is easy on the eyes and can be read in bright sunlight just like a real book. I used to have the problem when I traveled for work of loading down my suitcase with books. If I was going to be away for a week I would have to pack four or five books in my suitcase. I couldn't afford to just buy new books, especially when there is a library full of free books at home. Now I can pack one device, smaller than the average paperback, and carry more books than I'll ever read on one trip. You lose the feel, smell, and experience of holding and reading a real book, but I can live with the trade off in convenience and size. I can check out e-books from the library even easier than going and checking out real books.

I'm also a big fan of the audiobook. Download a book from the library on your phone or MP3 player via the Overdrive app and you can make your commute enjoyable and educational. I'll get to the end of a long road trip and want to keep going because the book isn't done yet!

So how do I incorporate books into my home design and decorations? There are a certain number of antique books that I will never get rid of. Some were passed down from my parents or grandparents. Others are just cool books I have found at garage sales or thrift stores. They need to be displayed for others to see and enjoy. I can't keep good books hidden away on a shelf or in a closet. I also had some books that I knew I would never read again in paper format. If I do decide to revisit them, I'll load them onto my e-reader. Instead of throwing them away or recycling them, I decided to use them to build shelves. This design uses a hard back book and an “L” bracket to create a floating shelf. When other books are stacked on top, it creates the illusion that the books are floating on the wall. It is a great effect and has been a huge talking point for friends and neighbors visiting the house. It is a simple project requiring only the purchase of the bracket, a book, some glue, and some screws and can be made for well under $5.