The Ceiling is Safe

Posted on by .

As I mentioned in my previous post, there are two load bearing walls running the length of the house. So before we could do anything else, we needed to take care of the sagging 2×4 beam in the bedroom. It has been under supported for who knows how long. I set up a temporary wall to support the joists while I was working and then took put the remaining studs to clear the way across the entire room. I prepped a beam and installed the jack studs at either end to support it. Four of us attempted to lift the beam into place and found the existing beam to have a significant sag, which made it impossible to fit the beam into one end. We used a jack to at least get the beam to sit on the stud, but it would not go in all the way. Using two jacks and a cross piece, we jacked up the joists just enough to get the beam in and then let the ceiling fall down onto our brand new beam. It worked like a charm! The sag is gone and we no longer have to worry about the ceiling caving in one us as we sleep.

No Open Concept Here

Posted on by .

Open concept is the design du jour and if you watch any kind of home improvement television is seen as a requirement in every remodel. Although I can see the value of an open concept, I’m also not sold on opening everything up. I still think there’s value in having a room separate from the chaos and mess of the kitchen and den. Of course, one does not always have the choice, like us.

Between our kitchen and the living room are the two load bearing walls sandwiched by the staircase to the basement. I guess we could get two beams and put up railings for the stairs, but that would look weird having a hole in the middle of the room. Also good design generally follows a circular pattern, but in our house there is only one way to get to the living room from the kitchen. We could have put a door in the opposite end except that is where they installed the new electrical panel. I guess we could relocate the panel, but that’s so far down the list it’s not even worth mentioning.

The kitchen had a small peninsula, which added some counter space and cupboards. But as there is no dining room, we need extra space for our kitchen table. So we lifted the peninsula out and cut it to size to lay flat against the wall. You can see the outline in the floor where the peninsula used to be. I can’t guarantee this will be our final solution, but it works for now and will give us the room to eat and cook. With some new counter tops, paint, and back splash, it should look nice.

My grandparents had an eat in kitchen in their farm house it, so we can too!

Old House Surprises

Posted on by .

Demo is great. Nothing feels better than swinging a hammer and knocking down a wall on purpose. Old homes are great. They have character and history and are built to last. I mean, our house has already lasted for 68 years. That should be a good indicator it was done right. Demo and old homes together? Some things great, some things not so much.

The footprint of our house is a simple rectangle. There are two walls running down the center of the house, so we figured either one or both would be load bearing. The most likely load bearing wall was the one between the master bedroom and the suite. It was the best candidate because it is the most continuous. A huge closet was cut into the other wall spanning the entire width of the master bedroom. That would be why taking walls down to the studs and having access to the attic are so important. The truth is out there.

File_001

Upon further inspection I found sistered ceiling joists which meet in between the two walls. The western most joist sat on the west wall and the eastern most joist on the east wall. They then butt up against the opposite wall. So I had confirmation they are both load bearing. Not that big a deal, except for the fact the “beam” is a dimensional 2×4 sitting on it’s face, and that’s it! I am assuming the closet was added later and was just not adequately supported.  We are going to have to add a beam and just incorporate it into the design of the room.

IMG_1119

We also found an old doorway between the master and the suite. I wonder what that was used for in the past?? Unfortunately we can’t just use it because it would significantly cut into closet storage space.  We have to move the door over toward the center of the wall.

IMG_1112

Other surprises? The bathroom ceiling had an extra layer of drywall tacked on, which had to be removed to make the entire ceiling uniform. That was fun. But I did find this wallpapered ceiling underneath, so you can’t beat that!

IMG_1113

And a good surprise? The floor joists run the opposite of the ceiling joists, which will make it so much easier to run plumbing to the new bathroom in between the joists!  Hooray!!

We Got Keys!

Posted on by .

The house is officially ours! We sold our last home in 2006 so we feel like brand new home owners. We went into the house for the first time on our own to really evaluate what needed to be done. We already had a plan on what we wanted to do, but it’s hard to really know the scope of work without punching a few holes in the wall. We had a small toolbox there, but none of the stuff we will really needed for the job. All of us took a turn punching holes in a wall, which by the way, is a fantastic feeling. We pulled up carpet and pulled up a bit of the kitchen linoleum. Here is where we stand.

The walls were built with a plaster board. At first I was confused, because it was covered in paper like drywall, and was in sheets like drywall, but was clearly not gypsum. I did some research and found that in the 60’s they came out with a product that would allow people to plaster their walls in sheets. Drywall had become more popular during WWII, but plaster was still considered primo. These sheets were like drywall, but filled with plaster. So today it feels more like concrete than drywall, but you can still easily punch a hole through the wall and tear it off. Conclusion: no problem to demo, but may take a little more time than standard gypsum board.

The carpet in the extra room, which I will call the suite from now on, came off pretty easily. Boy was it dirty under the pad. Years of dust sifting down through the carpet and pad. Underneath is a fantastic pine plank floor. There is some glue residue from the carpet, but no big deal. The majority of this wood will be lifted out for use on other projects. We will then tile the bathroom portion. Conclusion: as expected.

The carpet in the master bedroom was a different story. Under the current carpet we found the original carpet. It was worn threadbare, but still sticking hard to the pine floors. It was glued down and has a rubber like backing which does not want to come up. We researched and found a product called Sentinel 747 that we are going to try. Conclusion: this is going to take a long time and will be hard labor.

The linoleum in the kitchen is not glued down as thoroughly as it could be, which is good, but it is still a pain like any linoleum. Underneath is a 3/8″ plywood sub floor. Under that is the pine floor we are reaching for. We don’t know yet if they just screwed the plywood down or also glued it. We bought a heat gun to help soften the linoleum as we take it off. Hopefully the plywood isn’t glued. I would love to be able to lift the pieces whole so I can use them to patch the chicken coop and dog house. The condition of the pine remains to be seen. Conclusion: As expected, labor intensive work. Still some unknowns.

The chimney stack rises through what will become the washroom. It is currently covered in plaster and we want to expose the brick. Whoever plastered it did it right, steel mesh and all. Break out the pneumatic chisel. Conclusion: with the right tools, it shouldn’t be too bad. Hopefully the brick is in good shape.

After completing the evaluation, we took the next day to plan and make a list of things we needed. So last night was a Home Depot night instead of a work night. But tonight starts the real demolition. May our hammers swing freely! #DemoDay

Designing the Space

Posted on by .

I wanted to do more than just draw my design on a piece of paper, which would have turned into several pieces of paper as I tried things out and changed my mind. It was a good thing I didn’t, because there were several iterations of the design. I also wanted something that would help all of us envision what the space would look like that was pretty close to being “to scale.”

I looked up a popular CAD program, SketchUp. They offer a free version and a Pro version. The Pro version is fairly priced for what it can do, but way too much for someone like me with one project. It really is for the pros who do this kind of thing for a living. As I was looking I found they had a beta of their web based version. So being me, I of course had to try it. And it is awesome! It does take a little time getting used to the different functions. If you’ve never worked in 3D modeling before, it may take some time to wrap your brain around the different dimensions. My first effort was a fail and quickly abandoned as a training exercise. My second effort looked great, but is not to scale at all. So when I learned I was going to have to change the design completely anyway, I went in and created a model pretty close to scale. I am not going to say it’s perfect, because I know it’s not.

Once you get the hang of it, you can throw up some walls pretty quickly. I am very happy with the result. It has been very useful figuring out the design and also planning my materials list. If you are embarking on any kind of remodel or design change, or if you just like playing around, I recommend checking out my.sketchup.com.

Here is my model:

The Current Layout

Posted on by .

Right now the north side of the house, on the main floor, features the master bedroom and another room, which they advertised as a bedroom. It doesn’t have a closet, so technically it’s not a bedroom. The current owners placed a little wardrobe in it to count as the closet. The master bedroom has a long shallow closet with sliding glass doors on the east wall, which abuts up to the extra room. We considered using the extra room as a dining room, but that just didn’t work. And with the weird bathroom layout I spoke about in my last post, we decided to open a door through the east wall and turn the room into a master closet and master bath.

Here is the master bedroom facing the closet

And here is the room facing northeast

So now the problem is having a bathroom for guests. We don’t want everyone walking through our closet to get to our bathroom. We also don’t want people to have to go down to the basement. So if we knock down some walls and resize some things, we have figured out a way to create a small washroom and still have room for the master suite. I’ll talk about how I did the layout in my next post.

Back to the Drawing Board

Posted on by .

We did the final walk through of the house today and I took some additional measurements. My original plan for master suite project is not going to work. I forgot to measure the windows the first time through and the window is not centered in the room like I assumed it was. That’s what I get for assuming! That cuts into the closet way too much.

The window on the back wall is also a problem. It’s bigger than I thought and in my original plan it was going to be in the shower. It’s still possible but way too risky dealing with water. So I am going back to the drawing board to reconfigure everything.

My plan for the washroom and master toilet are still intact at least. The current bathroom has a really weird diagonal sink and jog to the right to get to the bath. The chimney runs up through the bathroom on one side. So I will rework everything and come up with a new plan. Wish me luck!

Here is he current weird bathroom.

The Farm House Restoration Project

Posted on by .

We are a week away from closing on a little farm house built in 1949. We are so excited! It is in great shape for its age. The previous owner replaced the roof and poured some concrete sidewalks and steps, so all of the structural stuff has been done. He added a builder grade bathroom in the basement and installed a new furnace and AC unit. That means we get to focus on the remodel!

We were actually looking for something a bit older but discovered a few problems in our area. The majority of the old homes were built in the city center, which is now a business district or an undesirable area. If you want land, which we did, you have to move outside of the city. The only older homes with land outside of the city were on county land and depended on well water. That seemed fine until we started talking to some neighbors and they all have had to drop 35-40k in the last few years to re-drill dried up wells. No thank you!

This house is on just over an acre and is a horse property, so we are able to have small and large animals should we so choose. After we close, we have some work to do before the house is ready for move in. Throughout the restoration, I plan to write blog posts, take photos, and even post videos on my YouTube channel. So please check back often to see how things are coming.

Doors, Wheels, and Headboards

Posted on by .

What do you do when you have a box spring and mattress and no bed set? Why, you make one of course. Bed sets are expensive and then you have to worry about getting matching furniture, a dresser, end tables, dressing table, etc. Who wants to shop through huge department stores offering no interest for five years and the best deals in town? Not me!

Instead of barn wood, this time I am going to use an old five panel door. It was a free door we got from a friend. They got it off of Craigslist. If you are looking for one, I would suggest Craigslist, garage sales, swap meets, or construction areas. People tear down old houses and the stuff is just going to the dump, They are often glad for someone to take it off their hands.

One side of the door I had was covered in a seventies era wavy panel, which much to my glee, came off easily and uncovered that side of the door was unpainted. Therefore, it was easy to sand the edges and prep for finish. After two coats of polyurethane, it was ready to go. I used 2x4s to create legs that could easily be adjusted for height and screwed to any standard bed frame.

Now for the fun stuff. I purchased an old iron wheel on Craigslist which I used for the play Oklahoma. It is a great piece, but what in the world was I going to do with it afterwords? Using the door knob hole, I inserted the axle of the wheel and wired the socket from an an old lamp through the hole. I attached the wheel securely with a bolt and plugged that baby in. We have a headboard with a lamp all ready to go. Check out the video below!

 

Cords Cords, and More Cords

Posted on by .

Flat screen televisions are great. You can hang them on the wall, above the mantle, or use the stand to put them on a cabinet. They don’t take up too much room, but their picture quality is excellent. Plasma, LCD, or LED, each has their pros and cons. It used to be if you wanted a big screen tv you needed a large room because the bigger the screen, the bigger the tv. Rear projection tvs were big, but the picture quality was bad and it seemed like you constantly had to adjust them to get the best color mix and sharpness. Tube tvs are rarely seen anymore. Flat panel tvs are light, easy to move, and easy to adjust.

But they still require lots of cords. One day someone will come up with a working high quality way to transmit HD video wirelessly, but until then, we are stuck wiring up all components. If the owners of the house were forward thinking or you own the house, you can hide the wires inside the wall. Many new houses come with an outlet and cable jack high up on the wall where most people would put the tv. You can buy boxes to easily install and run cords through the walls behind the drywall.

But what do you do when you are renting or decide to hang a tv in an unusual place? You can’t or don’t want to run the cords through the wall. What can you do? You can use cable runners, which stick on the wall. They usually come in white and are paintable to match the wall color. If you can run them on top of some molding or chair rail, you may be able to camouflage the runner from a casual glance. But at the end of the day, it is still visible. Also, what are you going to do at the end of the run? The cords have to come out somewhere. Do you have a media cabinet or shelf to put them on? Is that hidden from view? If you have a good system, you may have everything running through a receiver and only one HDMI cable going to your tv. You still want to hide that cord. My receiver is old, so it doesn’t have a way to run HDMI.

What components do you have running to your tv: Apple TV, Xbox, Playstation, Fire TV, DVD player, Bluray player, cable box? I have some components onside an old antique radio under the tv and some on shelves hidden by a privacy screen. So I had a lot of cords running all over the place.

To solve the problem of the cord nest in a stylish and designer approved way, I turned to my stash of barn wood I still had from taking down the barn. I made a frame out of 1×2 boards to start. I took the barn wood, cleaned the boards with a power washer, and ripped them to the same width. I then nailed them to the frame at an angle. I took my circular saw and cut them to the frame, then cleaned the line with a flush cut bit on my router. I nailed some perpendicular pieces across the boards on the back to strengthen it up and cut out some channels in the frame where the cords drop from the tv and out the sides.

Using a level and a stud finder, I prepped the piece to hang on the wall. It took three people to hang, two to hold and one to run the cords. I pushed it up against the tv and screwed it to the wall. It created four screw holes in the wall, but that’s no different than hanging pictures on the wall and can be easily patched. Now I have I great decorative piece on the wall that also hides all of my cords. Mission accomplished. Check out the video below and try it out for your house.